STATEMENT

SPENT 6

I have been a contemporary artist/printmaker for over twenty years with a studio in Tring, Hertfordshire. My work is driven by political and cultural concerns covering issues from Maternal/Female Subjectivity, Eating Dysmorphia and Memory to the Civil War in Syria; it is therefore conceptual and photographic in influence.

An interest in and knowledge of the Polymer Print process is the transformative tool which enables me to create visually strong imagery. Non toxic polymer printmaking is perfect for layering the documentary authenticity of photography with the versatility of Relief and Intaglio processes and its use of line, sumptuous texture and colour.

My Blog https://cyberslog.wordpress.com/ permits comment on recent exhibitions and other artist’s work and Art Theory, and this Blog is where I share some insights and images of my own practice and enjoy the feedback and support.

I have written about Art theory especially Feminism & Psychoanalysis in Art and have been published in the peer reviewed Journal of Visual Arts Practice. I have had technical essays published in Printmaking Today and I devised, found funding for and organised a Community Arts project called ‘A Day in the Life of Grovehill’ in Hemel Hempstead and would like to do more community work.

I open my studio to the public annually and this year I am opening in June as part of the Bucks Open Studios.  I enjoy sharing my knowledge and teach Non Toxic Polymer Printmaking in schools and colleges and in my studio.   I constantly look for new opportunities and collaborations to generate artworks and to find a new audience.  I am interested in new ideas and technologies and welcome exciting challenges.

THE OPERATOR. THE SPECTATOR. THE SPECTRUM.

Monotone Obscure.reveal - no border

OBSCURE / REVEAL I

Double-Plate Polymer Etching

280 x 385 mm

August 2015

“Whatever Photography grants to vision and whatever its manner, a photograph is always invisible:  it is not it that we see.”

Camera Lucida by Roland Barthes

This is the first of a new body of work that aims to explore the power of the partially obscured, or inadequately seen, photographic portrait.  In this print a powerful abstract swathe of ink threatens the image with invisibility and doing so adds potency to the impassive face.

We live in a world in which the art of memory seems almost obsolete, having been outsourced to communications technology, through which perfect, high-resolution images and information are endlessly uploaded and reproduced. These contemporary methods of digital record-keeping let me to wonder what impact this would have on our perception of ourselves, and the loss of meaning on our sensibilities. And what affect the proliferation of so many perfect representations of the human face would have on the appreciation of old and unclear photographic souvenirs, and whether their very fragility by contrast would confer some mystery and power on these fragments.

This triggered a new direction in my practice and an exploration into the impact of partly obscured portraits.  Francis Bacon stated that his portraiture sought to “Deform into the Truth” and in a similar way these prints aim to reveal by obscuring the unique nature and moment when this image was fixed for all time.